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Chat for fuck mobile

The primary motivation for the creation and use of SMS language was to convey a comprehensible message using the fewest number of characters possible.

I'm willing to bet Hangouts, despite being neglected, still has far more users than Allo and Duo.Likewise, such a change sought to accommodate the small number of characters allowed per message, and to increase convenience for the time-consuming and often small keyboards on mobile phones.In addition, similarly elliptical styles of writing can be traced to the days of telegraphese 120 years back, where telegraph operators were reported to use abbreviations similar to those used in modern text when chatting amongst themselves in between sending of official messages.This motivates the anglicization of such languages, especially those using non-Latin orthographies (i.e.not using Latin alphabets) following for instance, the even more limited message lengths involved when using for example, Cyrillic or Greek letters.Faramerz Dabhoiwala wrote in The Guardian in 2016: "modern usages that horrify linguistic purists in fact have deep historical roots.

"OMG" was used by a septuagenarian naval hero, admiral of the fleet Lord Fisher, in 1917".

However, screens are still small and the input problem persists, so SMS language is still widely used for brevity.

Observations and classifications as to the linguistic and stylistic properties of SMS language have been made and proposed by Crispin Thurlow, There are many examples of words or phrases that share the same abbreviations (e.g., lol could mean laugh out loud, lots of love, or little old lady, and cryn could mean crayon or cryin(g)).

One example is the use of "tomoz" instead of "tomorrow". that is a dialect strongly if not completely derivative of the English language. Such generalization may have risen from the fact that mobile phones had only been able to support a limited number of default languages in the early stages of its conception and distribution.

Nevertheless, there are no standard rules for the creation and use of SMS languages. A mobile operating system (OS) such as Symbian and language packs enable the linguistic localization of products that are equipped with such interfaces, where the current Symbian release (Symbian Belle) supports the scripts and orthographies of over 48 languages and dialects, though such provisions are by no means fully comprehensive as to the languages used by users all over the world.

As a result, punctuation, grammar, and capitalization are largely ignored.