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Speed dating at the strand

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Textiles are used in many traditional crafts such as sewing, quilting and embroidery.Textiles for industrial purposes, and chosen for characteristics other than their appearance, are commonly referred to as technical textiles.

Textiles are made from many materials, with four main sources: animal (wool, silk), plant (cotton, flax, jute), mineral (asbestos, glass fibre), and synthetic (nylon, polyester, acrylic). In the 20th century, they were supplemented by artificial fibres made from petroleum.are often used in textile assembly trades (such as tailoring and dressmaking) as synonyms for textile.However, there are subtle differences in these terms in specialized usage.Technical textiles include textile structures for automotive applications, medical textiles (e.g.implants), geotextiles (reinforcement of embankments), agrotextiles (textiles for crop protection), protective clothing (e.g.A textile is any material made of interlacing fibres, including carpeting and geotextiles.

A fabric is a material made through weaving, knitting, spreading, crocheting, or bonding that may be used in production of further goods (garments, etc.).

The production of textiles is a craft whose speed and scale of production has been altered almost beyond recognition by industrialization and the introduction of modern manufacturing techniques.

However, for the main types of textiles, plain weave, twill, or satin weave, there is little difference between the ancient and modern methods.

Cloth may be used synonymously with fabric but is often a finished piece of fabric used for a specific purpose (e.g., table cloth).

The word 'fabric' also derives from Latin, most recently from the Middle French fabrique, or 'building, thing made', and earlier as the Latin fabrica 'workshop; an art, trade; a skilful production, structure, fabric', which is from the Latin faber, or 'artisan who works in hard materials', from PIE dhabh-, meaning 'to fit together'.

Woollen refers to a bulkier yarn produced from carded, non-parallel fibre, while worsted refers to a finer yarn spun from longer fibres which have been combed to be parallel. Cashmere, the hair of the Indian cashmere goat, and mohair, the hair of the North African angora goat, are types of wool known for their softness.